Ross Moriarty is hoping to follow in his father and his uncle’s footsteps by delivering World Cup success for his country.

Wales’ dramatic 29-25 success in Tokyo was Wales’ first World Cup victory over the Wallabies since 1987, when they won a third-place play-off game.

Moriarty’s father Paul and his uncle Richard both started that match, and Ross delivered a huge defensive performance off the bench 32 years later as Wales closed in on a quarter-final place.

“My parents came out for the game, and have gone home now, but it was a special day for me,” Moriarty said.

Asked if they would be returning to Japan, he added: “When we get to the final, yeah!

“Dad’s very emotional when it comes to me playing rugby, especially for Wales. To be involved for this World Cup again, it was a big one.

“They just know – bench or start – when I’ve come off I will have given everything. That’s all they know I can do.

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Alun Wyn Jones and Warren Gatland say Wales showed character victory over Australia

Alun Wyn Jones and Warren Gatland say Wales showed character victory over Australia

“I felt like the involvement I had in that game on the weekend, even though it was pretty much just defensive, I knew I had put in 100 per cent and helped the boys get the win.”

Dragons back-row forward Moriarty has started 29 of his 36 Tests in Wales colours, so a relatively unfamiliar role awaited him in games against Georgia and Australia after he was named among the replacements.

Wales head coach Warren Gatland opted for a starting back-row of Aaron Wainwright, Justin Tipuric and Josh Navidi each time, but he was quick to praise Moriarty’s response after being left out.

Wales won a tight game 29-25 against Australia on Sunday Wales won a tight game 29-25 against Australia on Sunday Wales won a tight game 29-25 against Australia on Sunday

“It was disappointing not to get the start, but putting that aside, the bigger picture is to help the team and make sure we prepare as well as we can and be that opposition in training,” he added.

“To be on the bench is obviously disappointing for myself, but I know my role in the team, and when I come on the pitch it changes that mindset for me.

“I came on for 35 minutes at the weekend, and it felt like I had played the 80. Coming off the bench, I am aiming to give the boys energy and put my front foot forward.”

Moriarty was at the heart of some intensely-fierce Wales training sessions building towards facing Australia – and that is exactly how he likes it.

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Michael Hooper admits Australia’s first-half performance was costly during their 25-29 defeat to Wales in Pool D

Michael Hooper admits Australia’s first-half performance was costly during their 25-29 defeat to Wales in Pool D

“We want to push each other as hard as we can,” he said.

“Whether that’s physicality, fitness, and when we have to smash each other, we just smash each other.

“It’s 100 per cent going into training, because we know that is going to be the best way to prepare ourselves for tough games. I feel last week was a very big week in training, and that definitely put us in good stead for the game.

“I enjoyed that side of training last week, and that obviously showed in the game. We prepared well and we put it in on the pitch.